Skip Navigation LinksHome : Colleges : College of Undergraduate Studies : Bachelor of Arts in Psychology : Courses

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS  The student must complete a total of 120 credit hours as follows:

General Education (42 Credits)
Students must complete the following General Education requirements:

  • 6 credit hours in academic and interpersonal skills, COM180 and ASP100. Courses must be taken in the first semester and no transfer of credit is accepted for either course.
  • 6 credit hours in Communications including ENG101
  • 6 credit hours in Humanities
  • 6 credit hours in Social Sciences including PSY101
  • 6 credit hours in Natural Science
  • 6 credit hours in Mathematics
  • 6 credit hours in elective courses (in any general education distribution area)

Core Requirements (33 Credits)

PSY210 Psychological Statistics

This course will introduce you to statistical concepts and tests used in psychological research as well as analysis and computation.

PSY260 Child and Adolescent Psychology

This course provides an introduction to development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Major theories and research methods in developmental psychology will be discussed. Topics include physical, socio-emotional, moral, and cognitive development. The course examines family, school, and community practices and experiences which contribute to the integrated personality of the individual.

PSY302 Research Methods

Review of quantitative and qualitative scientific research methods used to investigate psychological questions. Emphasis on gathering and evaluating information from multiple sources, synthesizing findings from available literature into specific research questions, and designing effective methods to address those questions. Emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, and developing writing skills in a style appropriate to the discipline of psychology.
Prerequisite: PSY101, PSY210

PSY362 Personality Theories

This course examines theoretical models of personality structure and development. Relevant research and psychometric methods are discussed. Students will explore the impact of culture on both theory and measurement.

PSY363 Cognitive Psychology

This course presents an overview of the major topics in cognitive psychology including perception, attention, memory, imagery, knowledge representation, categorization, problem solving, language, decision making, and reasoning. Theories dealing with these issues will be reviewed with an emphasis on current research findings and applications.

PSY369 Career Choices in Psychology

This course introduces students to techniques useful for planning their career development within the discipline of psychology. It helps students analyze career options for those completing a bachelor’s degree in psychology, and career options for those who pursue a graduate degree. Students also explore professional organizations in the field as well as ethical and professional issues in the discipline of psychology.

PSY310 Social Psychology

Survey of theory and research on human social behavior, including topics such as aggression, attitudes, attribution, group dynamics, interpersonal relations, and prejudice and stereotypes. Emphasis on the diversity of human experience and ethical conflicts in psychological research and practice.

PSY350 Physiological Psychology

Survey of relationships of physiological processes, especially nervous system functioning, to behavior. Emphasis on current, interdisciplinary research findings on brain and behavior and their applications.
Prerequisite: Natural science course

PSY381 Abnormal Psychology

This course focuses on biopsychosocial models of psychological disorders and maladaptive patterns of behavior. Human behaviors are examined within the framework of the DSM-IV TR classification system. Students explore multicultural views of human behavior and potential ethical dilemmas associated with classifying or describing behavior as pathological or maladaptive.

PSY430 Ethics in Psychology

This course explores legal, ethical, and professional choices in the human services field. Topics include confidentiality, professional values, client rights, scope of practice, complaint procedures, informed consent, and standards of care. A multicultural perspective is used throughout the course.

PSY492 Advanced General Psychology (Capstone Course)

Advanced seminar on topics from the natural and social sciences knowledge bases of the discipline. A portfolio of papers and projects from prior coursework will be completed, including a literature review. This course ties together the theories and methods of psychology as a science and practice, and is a scholarly integration of ethics, diversity, and effective written and oral communication skills developed during the baccalaureate program.

Concentration Requirements

Students enrolled in the BA in Psychology Program may take an optional concentration in Criminal Justice, Organizational Psychology, Substance Abuse, Advanced Studies, Human Services, or Child and Adolescent Studies. There are 12 credit hours in each Concentration needed for the Bachelor of Arts in Psychology Program. Students may choose one:


Criminal Justice

Students enrolled in the BA in Psychology Program may take an optional concentration in Criminal Justice. The Criminal Justice concentration offers coursework for students interested in the causes, treatment, and impact of crime on communities. Students examine psychological perspectives on the offender, including the history and theories of criminal justice. Policies and procedures of criminal justice, legal, and mental health settings will also be explored. Students also learn about effective treatment approaches that are effective with offenders, particularly substance abuse treatment.

Students with a concentration are required to take these 4 courses. The concentration courses not applied to a student’s concentration may also be taken as electives.

PSY422 Forensic Psychology

In-depth examination of the theories and methods of forensic psychology and their applications to the policies and procedures of criminal justice, legal, and mental health settings.

PSY494 Substance Abuse Treatment in the Criminal Justice System

This course will examine treatment and intervention approaches that are effective with the offenders in correctional settings. Such topics to be introduced are drug and alcohol treatment in correctional institutions, treatment modalities, principles of the therapeutic communities, characteristics and traits of the offender and issues related to the transition into the community.

PSY498 Psychology and the Criminal Mind

This course provides students with an understanding of psychology as it has been applied to criminal behavior. The course applies psychological perspectives to examine offenders’ individual characteristics, such as intelligence, personality, and psychopathology. Biopsychosocial theories of offending behavior are explored.

PSY303 Introduction to Crime and Causes

This course provides a historical overview of theories of crime and causes, as well as current approaches to understanding deviant behavior. Students study environmental, cultural, developmental, and biological influences on the manifestation of individual and group criminal behavior. The course explores criminal behavior at various stages of the life span.

Organizational Psychology

Students enrolled in the BA in Psychology Program may take an optional concentration in Organizational Psychology. The primary goal of the Organizational Psychology concentration is to help students acquire the knowledge, skills, and competencies they need to qualify for entry-level management or leadership positions in a variety of organizations.

Students with a concentration are only required to take 4 of these courses. The concentration courses not applied to a student’s concentration may also be taken as electives.

MGT411 Human Resource Management

Students explore the values and perceptions of the workforce through an analysis of policies and practices of recruitment, selection, training, development, and compensation of employees. Special attention is placed on problem solving, case studies, and simulations associated with human resource management.

PSY320 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

This course surveys individual behavior and groups in organizations and the application of this knowledge for improving organizational effectiveness and the welfare of people who work in organizations. The course provides an overview of both applied individual differences, such as personnel selection, job design, and training, and organizational influences, such as emotions in the workplace, group behavior, motivation, and leadership. Ethical and legal dimensions of conducting psychological research and practice in the workplace are also explored.

BUS381 Solutions Focused Leadership

This course examines the process by which leaders and team members generate alternatives and select appropriate courses of action to meet organizational objectives. Competing principles of leadership are considered and the characteristics of effective leadership across multiple settings are considered.

PSY415 Psychological Assessment (3 credit hours)

In-depth examination of assessment processes and measurement strategies for aptitudes, intelligence, interests, performance, and personality of diverse population. Ethical, legal, and social issues in test theory, construction, and evaluation. Emphasis on psychometric properties.
Prerequisite: PSY210

Substance Abuse

Students enrolled in the BA in Psychology Program may take an optional concentration in Substance Abuse. The primary goal of the Substance Abuse concentration is to help students acquire the knowledge, skills, and competencies they need to qualify for entry-level substance abuse management or leadership positions in a variety of health-related organizations.

Students with a concentration are only required to take 4 of these courses. The concentration courses not applied to a student’s concentration may also be taken as electives.

PSY481 Substance Abuse and the Family

This course is an introduction to family systems, focusing on the effects of addiction pertaining to family roles and behavior patterns. The impact of mood-altering substances and behaviors as they relate to the family are discussed, along with multicultural and transgenerational issues. Students are introduced to family interventions and treatment.

PSY370 Introduction to Addiction and Addictive Behavior

This introductory course provides an overview of addictions and substance abuse, including alcoholism and drug abuse. It introduces both the physiological and psychological characteristics of substance abuse and its effect in various life areas. Both individual and family dynamics are covered, as well as ideas for treatment options and recovery. Cross addiction and dual-diagnosis are discussed.

PSY496 Substance Abuse Assessment

This course covers substance abuse assessment, motivational interviewing, and the theory of change with an emphasis on screening, intake, orientation, assessment, and treatment planning. Topics include a broad overview of standardized screening and assessment instruments commonly used by substance abuse counselors. Implications of ethics and diversity are discussed.
Prerequisite: PSY370

PSY497 Substance Abuse Treatment

This course covers substance abuse treatment and co-occurring disorders with an emphasis on counseling, case-management, crisis intervention, client education, referral, reports and record-keeping, and consultation. Treatment will be examined from multiple theoretical perspectives. Individual and group counseling techniques are covered. Implications of ethics and diversity are discussed.
Prerequisite: PSY496

Advanced Studies

Students enrolled in the BA in Psychology Program may take an optional concentration in Advanced Studies.

Students with a concentration are required to take these 4 courses. The concentration courses not applied to a student’s concentration may also be taken as electives.

PSY383 Learning and Behavior

This course examines basic learning and motivation processes that allow organisms to acquire new knowledge and adapt to their environments. A special emphasis is placed on the social context of theories of learning and their implications of behavioral adjustment for applied practice. These learning processes include classical and operant conditioning, reinforcement, categorization, and others. Applications to behavioral analysis and modification are explored.

PSY384 Sensation and Perception

This course examines the relationship between physiological processes and factors such as experience and context in how the sensory and nervous systems construct our perception of the world. Topics include basic sensory physiology, psychophysics, visual perception, auditory perception, tactile perception, and the chemical senses. Theories dealing with these issues are reviewed with an emphasis on current research findings and applications. Students gain first-hand experience in carrying out perceptual experiments.

PSY415 Psychological Assessment

This course provides an in-depth examination of measurement strategies and psychometric properties, for the assessment of aptitudes, intelligence, interests, performance, and personality of diverse populations. Ethical, legal, and social issues in test theory, construction, and evaluation are examined.
Prerequisite: PSY210

PSY450 History and Systems

This course reviews the development of the discipline of psychology from its philosophical roots to the present, with an emphasis on the last 100 years. This course includes an in-depth examination of psychology as a science, practice, and sociocultural force in contemporary times. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and writing skills.
Prerequisite: PSY210

Human Services

Students enrolled in the BA in Psychology Program may take an optional concentration in Human Services.

Students with a concentration are required to take these 4 courses. The concentration courses not applied to a student’s concentration may also be taken as electives.

PSY370 Introduction to Addictions and Addictive Behavior

This introductory course provides an overview of addictions and substance abuse, including alcoholism and drug abuse. It introduces both the physiological and psychological characteristics of substance abuse and its effect in various life areas. Both individual and family dynamics are covered, as well as ideas for treatment options and recovery. Cross addiction and dual-diagnosis are discussed.

PSY383 Learning and Behavior

This course examines basic learning and motivation processes that allow organisms to acquire new knowledge and adapt to their environments. A special emphasis is placed on the social context of theories of learning and their implications of behavioral adjustment for applied practice. These learning processes include classical and operant conditioning, reinforcement, categorization, and others. Applications to behavioral analysis and modification are explored.

PSY400 Counseling Theories

This course provides an explanation of basic theories, principles, and techniques of professional mental health counseling, and their application to professional mental health settings . Also considered are the various issues involved in the practice of professional counseling, such as ethics and diversity.

PSY405 Interviewing Techniques

Interviewing Techniques is an applied course designed to develop basic relationship building, interviewing, reporting, problem-solving and decision-making skills with diverse clients. The focus is on fundamentals and techniques that cut across multiple interviewing situations. The fundamentals and techniques learned will prepare students for current real-world applications. For those students planning to attend graduate school, the fundamentals and techniques learned will serve as a foundation for the development and refinement of clinical skills.
Prerequisite: PSY101

Child and Adolescent Studies

PSY301 Children and Violence

This course enables students to gain an understanding of the issues resulting from children's exposure to violence. Through a review of research, students learn about children as both victims and perpetrators of violence. Potential negative outcomes are addressed as well as protective factors, which help mitigate the effects. Best practices for designing prevention and intervention programs are discussed in the context of individual, community, psychological, and judicial realms. Students will also learn about ethical considerations when working with children involved in violence, as well as the importance of cultural sensitivity when intervening.

PSY308 Abnormal Child & Adolescent Psychology

This course provides an introduction to the most common psychological disorders affecting children and adolescents. Current issues, theories, and research related to the diagnosis and treatment of the disorders are examined. A developmental approach is used, analyzing the biopsychosocial factors that play a role in the disorders’ onset and expression. The following categories of disorders are studied: behavioral, emotional, developmental, learning, and eating.

PSY309 Psychology of Exceptional Children

This course examines atypical development of children and adolescents, including those with disabilities as well as those considered gifted and talented. Research on environmental, biological, and cognitive influences on development, as well as considerations for culturally and linguistically diverse children are explored. In addition to identifying the continuum of exceptional children, best practices for interventions and services for home, school, and transition to adulthood are included. Legal and ethical considerations are also considered.

PSY311 Child, Family, and Community Relationships

This course focuses on the factors related to family life that influence the development of children and adolescents, and the ways in which professionals and families work together for the benefit of children of all ages. Professional and informal communication strategies, family structures, family interactions, family education, advocacy for families, and the influence of the community and culture are explored. Special attention is given to supporting child and family resiliency despite the complexities of modern life.

General Electives (33 Credits)

Students complete a collection of elective courses selected from those in the undergraduate catalog subject to availability.

Concentration Electives

Students who chose not to select an optional concentration, may fulfill their elective requirements by selecting four courses from the concentrations listed above.

Yes No
Yes No

By clicking the button below as my official signature, I consent to representatives of Argosy University contacting me about educational opportunities via phone, including my mobile phone if provided above, using an automatic dialer. I understand that my consent is not a requirement for any purchase.


Placement Policy

Math Requirement

  • Students who transfer in one or more General Education Math course will not be required to take a placement test.
  • Students with no college credit in General Education Math will be placed in a developmental course per the Registration Policy for Developmental Coursework. However, they can choose to place out of developmental coursework by passing a placement test.

Writing Requirement

  • Students who transfer in one or more General Education Writing course will not be required to take a placement test.
  • Students with no college credit in General Education English will be placed in a developmental course per the Registration Policy for Developmental Coursework. However, they can choose to place out of developmental coursework by passing a placement test.

Developmental Coursework

Students who do not have transfer of credit in General Education Math and/or English, or do not successfully complete a placement test in either Math or English, may only enroll in developmental coursework after the first session until at least one of the developmental courses is successfully completed.

If developmental coursework for both Math and English is successfully completed, students proceed into their given program of study.

If developmental coursework is successfully completed in only one area (Math or English), students proceed according to the policies that govern enrollment in Mathematics Review or English Review. Students whose placement test scores are below the established cutoff in only one area (Math or English) may register for other coursework per the following policies:

Mathematics Review Policies

Prior to successful completion of a developmental course Mathematics Review I, students are limited to registration in the following General Education electives: PSY101 General Psychology, SCI110 The Rise of Modern Science, SCI115 The Ecological Perspective, POL110 American Experience, BIO120 Human Anatomy and Physiology.

Mathematics Review I may be retaken a second time, but students may not register for other courses until the developmental coursework has been completed with a grade of C- or higher . Students who fail their second attempt of a developmental course will be referred to the Student Professional Development Committee to address barriers to academic readiness.

English Review Policies

English Review I: Students not taking the placement test, or having placement scores below a certain threshold will be placed in English Review I. After the successful completion of English Review I they will bep laced in English Review II. Prior to successful completion of English Review I, students are limited to registration in the following General Education electives: PSY101 General Psychology, SCI110 The Rise of Modern Science, SCI115 The Ecological Perspective, POL110 American Experience, ECO201 Macroeconomics, ECO202 Microeconomics, BIO120 Human Anatomy and Physiology.

English Review II Students with placement test scores above the threshold for English Review I but with scores below the cutoff for passing will be placed in English Review II. Prior to successful completion of English Review II, students are limited to registration in the following General Education electives: PSY101 General Psychology, SCI110 The Rise of Modern Science, SCI115 The Ecological Perspective, POL110 American Experience, ECO201Macroeconomics, ECO202 Microeconomics, BIO120 Human Anatomy and Physiology.

English Review I and English Review II may be retaken a second time, but students may not register for other courses until the developmental coursework has been completed with a grade of C- or higher. Students who fail their second attempt of a developmental course will be referred to the Student Professional Development Committee to address barriers to academic readiness.

Notes:


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
  • Satisfactory completion of all required courses within the program major with a grade of “C-“ or better
  • Completion of 120 credit hours as follows:
    • 42 credit hours of General Education Curriculum Requirements
    • 33 credit hours Psychology Core Requirements
    • 12 credit hours Concentration Requirements
    • 33 credit hours Elective Requirements
  • Completion of a minimum of 42 credit hours of upper division courses
  • Satisfactory completion of all required psychology courses at Argosy University within the program major, including electives, with a grade of “C-“ or better
  • An Argosy University grade point average of 2.0 or higher
  • A completed Petition to Graduate submitted to campus administration